Archive for Geoff Tansey

Photo diary: A story of sustainability in China

In an audio slideshow special, food writer and consultant Geoff Tansey wonders what will happen to the ancient rice terraces of the Far East.

Geoff Tansey

Will China build on its long-term sustainable farming systems, such as these famous rice terraces in Yunnan, or abandon them?

That’s the question I’ve found myself pondering about since my most recent visit to China.

As you can see in these pictures, for many visitors to China it’s the gleaming new city centres, glitzy shopping malls and swathes of high-rise apartments that seem to grow faster than their crops that impress.
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On the food road

In a special photo-travelogue, Geoff Tansey explores China’s problems and solutions as a powerhouse of agricultural production.

Geoff Tansey

Astounding 1600-year-old rice terraces, rapidly expanding cities, surprising labour shortages, huge organic vegetable production, small village plots, and much recent research science on soils, water and roots: my two trips to China had some of what I expected and much more that I didn’t.


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Sustainable intensification – miracle or mirage?

Geoff Tansey unravels the rhetoric at a food security conference at the Royal Institute for International Affairs, Chatham House.

Geoff Tansey

The meeting in London on 10-11 December 2012 was held under the Chatham House Rule, which forbids identification of speakers, so you may find this a rather frustrating blog.

One speaker asked participants the key question: why was the meeting talking about the sustainable intensification of agricultural production when the world already produces enough for everyone; when one third of all food produced ends up as waste; when an estimated 40% of corn in the US in 2013 is going to biofuel; and up to 90% of soya produced globally is used for animals not humans?
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Food and the economy of fairness

Truly sustainable agricultural systems require scientific innovation based around new social and economic principles, says Geoff Tansey.

Geoff Tansey

The fundamental reasons why people face food insecurity are not mainly the scientific and technical.

As a Food Ethics Council Food and Fairness inquiry concluded, the problems we face cannot simply be solved from within a food system perspective but are rooted in institutional features of how the world works today. Within existing frameworks, technological innovation alone will not deliver the kind of change needed to achieve a well-fed world, sustainably and equitably.
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