2 thoughts on “Introducing the Global Food Security programme’s Public Panel

  1. An interesting and potentially very useful initiative. I pioneered aeroponics in the mid 1970s and then pioneered commercial aeroponics in the early 1980s (on the Isle of Wight). Although most of the results were fairly spectacular in terms of speed of growth and yields (e.g. roughly ten times higher than normal potato yields) they were almost always dismissed as “unbelievable”by commercial growers and academics. Mainly, I suspect because I have no relevant academic background. A typical example of the many brush-offs I have received over the years was from Professor Charles Godfray, Director, Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food after I had sent him information about the results of my aeroponic research work. His reply read as follows “Dear John, Apologies, but have insufficient expertise to comment meaningfully here. Best wishes, Charles.” Sustainable protected aeroponic systems will become vitally important as climate change effects and side-effects become ever more disruptive of conventional agricultural practices. I’m keen to help in any way I can. Regards, John

  2. Thanks for your comment John.
    The Public Panel have spend quite a bit of time discussing ‘urban agriculture’ broadly and the place for non-conventional approaches (though not aeroponics specifically) – the results of these discussions will be published in the next few weeks.

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