Archive for Tim Benton

Global Food Security programme Champion Tim Benton summarises specially commissioned GFS reports on the topic.

Tim Benton

Rarely a week goes by without there being news of weather records being broken.

We have recently had the hottest June recorded across four continents. The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) trumpeted that in a single week in February 2185 local weather records were broken as an unmoving ridge of high pressure kept the US west coast unseasonably hot, and the east coast unseasonably cold.
Continue reading Future shocks: how resilient is the UK food system to extreme global weather events?

A major new report spells out what science can, and can’t, do to help provide nutritious food for all. Co-author and GFS Champion Tim Benton provides an inside eye on the Milan Expo 2015.

Tim Benton

The first ‘Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations’ famously took place at Crystal Palace in 1851. It spawned a regular series, of which the 99th Universal Exposition will take place in 2015 in Milan, Italy, on the theme Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life
Continue reading The role of research in food and nutrition security

Nexology for the New Year

The word ‘nexus’ seems to be cropping up everywhere, but what does it mean for food security? Global Food Security Champion Tim Benton explains.

Tim Benton

Following Christmas, often an annual festival of demand and excess, maybe January is the time to think about demand-management. At the end of last year, I was involved in a flurry of meetings with the term ’nexus ‘ in the title. Nexus essentially means interconnectedness, or binding together.
Continue reading Nexology for the New Year

Cars, cows and carbon

Cutting an American family’s meat consumption by half is equivalent to getting rid of a car. Why isn’t the pressure on, asks Tim Benton.

Tim Benton

The most recent figures for carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere give one pause for thought. There was a bigger increase in CO2 in the atmosphere over the last year than had been recorded for many years; despite all we know, carbon is increasing faster than ever, and faster than imagined in IPCC’s ‘worst case’ scenarios.
Continue reading Cars, cows and carbon

Framing the big picture: going round in circles

GFS Champion Tim Benton explains how engaging with people has shifted his views.

Tim Benton

I am very privileged in the role of Global Food Security (GFS) Champion to meet many people and discuss the challenges raised by global demand for food outstripping supply. I have had such discussions with a large range of groups in different government departments: Health, Defra, DFID and the FCO in the UK as well as the Scottish and Welsh governments.
Continue reading Framing the big picture: going round in circles

Waste not, want not

GFS Champion Tim Benton looks to the New Year and considers food waste on national and personal levels (including his own recipes).

Tim Benton

I enjoy cooking, so do the kitchen duty when I am at home. And, of course, Christmas is the most intensive cooking festival. I just totted up that I prepared 141 meals, spread over 32 mealtimes. No wonder coming back to work seems restful!

As food waste is such an issue, we worked hard to minimise waste over the period through a concerted effort of planning, inventorying and negotiation over how to eat left overs. As a result, we threw away very little that was avoidable, perhaps though at the expense of over-consumption!
Continue reading Waste not, want not

Christmas is traditionally a time of celebrating via food. GFS Champion Tim Benton explores the question of whether we should be more self-sufficient in producing it.

Tim Benton

One of the questions asked in Westminster is “should the UK be more self-sufficient in food production?” According to government (PDF) data about 62% of our food is produced in Great Britain.

Last August, 62% of the way through the year, the National Farmers’ Union had a Back British Farming campaign pointing out that were there no international trade our “larder would be bare” from August onwards – definitely a problem for the Christmas feast then  – and so growing more food locally would be benefit  our food security by increasing self-sufficiency.
Continue reading Season’s greedings: self-sufficiency and the UK food system

The price is right? Wrong!

We have learnt a lot from the 2007/8 food price spike, but the future will be a bumpy ride says GFS Champion Tim Benton.

Tim Benton

The historical era of falling food prices is over. Global demand for food is continuing to increase while production growth has slowed in recent years, leading to significant upward pressure on prices.

It is well recognised that world’s biological and ecological resources (its ’natural capital‘) provides ecosystem services that subsidise production costs: think about how soil fertility, promoted by soil biodiversity, pollination, natural pest control and the climate support agricultural production. Fully investing in sustaining the natural capital, via management of soils, biodiversity, water and carbon emissions would raise food production costs and add to prices. 
Continue reading The price is right? Wrong!

Eating: how much is too much?

GFS Champion Tim Benton takes a personal look at weight gain and ruminates on what quantifies over consumption.

Tim Benton

As many readers of this blog will appreciate, the demand for food is rising globally and many posts on this site tackle the issues associated with increasing production. The demand-side of the equation perhaps gets less attention than it deserves.

Like many people of middle age, I have gained weight in recent years.  Yes, I know of many extenuating circumstances (= “excuses”) that have changed my daily energy budget, but the ineluctable truth is that I have piled on the best part of 10 kilos in the last decade.
Continue reading Eating: how much is too much?

Life, death and looking ahead

A birth and bereavement gives food for thought. GFS Champion Tim Benton reflects.

Tim Benton

Two recent events – the death of my father and the birth of a friend’s first child – have made me ponder about the course of a human life. In particular, for someone born now what will happen to the world during their lifetime?

During our debates over food security and climate change we often look ahead. But does the timescale we choose to look ahead matter? If so, is there one that resonates with sufficient power to promote action?
Continue reading Life, death and looking ahead